Rwandan Genocide Peace Agreement

On 6 April 1994, the plane of Habyarimana and Burundian President Cyprien Ntaryamira (also Hutu) was shot down on its way to Kigali airport. The responsibility for the attack is the fight, with Hutu extremists and the RPF suspected. The attack was a catalyst for the Rwandan genocide. It was one of many attacks that took place with similar political motivations, with moderates targeted by the CDR, the hard-line group, which was once part of the MRND. UNAMIR soldiers were present before, during and after the violence. The restrictions imposed by the United Nations due to national sovereignty and the need to remain impartial in the execution of chapter 6 peacekeeping operations have led the MISSION to do more than bear witness to the genocide. After the death of ten Belgian soldiers in April 1994, the Belgian contingent was withdrawn from Rwanda and the size of the mission was reduced to about 270 men. International powers, such as France, Britain and the United States, did not have the political motivation to send troops or financial support to UNAMIR, although many of these countries were able to get their foreigners out of danger. The July 1992 N`sele ceasefire agreement provided for the deployment of the Neutral Military Observer Group (NMOG) under the supervision of the Secretary-General of OAU. The NMOG, which has 50 military observers, will oversee the ceasefire that led to political negotiations and a peace treaty between the two parties to the conflict in Rwanda.

In accordance with this mandate, the Secretary-General of the OAU appointed his personal representative in Rwanda on 29 July 1992 to monitor a ceasefire. The ceasefire agreement was due to enter into force at the end of July.1 The Joint Political and Military Commission, composed of representatives of the Rwandan government, the RPF and international observers, met at OAU headquarters and a commander for an NMOG was appointed.2 To adapt an old metaphor when Rwanda sneezed, Congo and Burundi became cold. It is common knowledge that the ongoing conflicts in Congo, Rwanda and Burundi are inseparable from cross-border uprisings, cross-border ethnic ties and cross-border economic relations. The legacy of genocide – both the 1994 Rwandan genocide, which killed nearly a million Tutsis and moderate Hutus, as well as the minor but no less significant genocide of Hutus in Burundi in 1972 – and major municipal massacres such as the massacre of Tutsis in Burundi in 1993, hangs harshly over the Great Lakes region. . . .